Idioms & expressions

Add new idioms and expressions to your vocabulary. Learn how to use them in real-life situations.

Ginormous — Is it a real word and when to use it?

Ginormous — Is it a real word and when to use it?

The meaning of “ginormous” is to be extremely large or very big, so it’s an adjective that describes a size.

Milena Lazova
Milena Lazova
English
Getting to grips with Phrasal Verbs

Getting to grips with Phrasal Verbs

A phrasal verb is the combination of mostly two words, they are made up of a verb and a particle or, sometimes, two particles.

Lyndsey Whittle
Lyndsey Whittle
English
What is “Full-Proof”?

What is “Full-Proof”?

Most people are familiar with the definition of foolproof, but what about the full-proof?

Aneeca Younas
Aneeca Younas
English
The differences between “How are you doing?” and “How are you?”

The differences between “How are you doing?” and “How are you?”

The two phrases typically sound the same. But do you know that there’s a significant difference between “how are you?” and “how are you doing?”

Geoffrey Mutie
Geoffrey Mutie
English
Nerve-wracking or nerve-racking — Which spelling is correct?

Nerve-wracking or nerve-racking — Which spelling is correct?

Nerve-wracking and nerve-racking are two very similar-looking words. But are there any differences between them both?

Aneeca Younas
Aneeca Younas
English
To whom it may concern: When to use it and when to avoid It

To whom it may concern: When to use it and when to avoid It

When you use the phrase “To Whom It May Concern” it can make you sound ancient and offensive. It’s an outdated salutation that sounds out of place in this century.

Milena Lazova
Milena Lazova
English
Saying all of a sudden vs. all of the sudden

Saying all of a sudden vs. all of the sudden

If you’ve ever read an old detective paperback or suspense novel, you’re almost certainly already familiar with the phrase “all of a sudden.” It’s used to denote an event that occurs as a surprise or in an unguarded moment.

Cecilia Gigliotti
Cecilia Gigliotti
English
My apologies or my apology — how to use these phrases correctly

My apologies or my apology — how to use these phrases correctly

Both phrases for apologizing are correct, but they are used on different occasions.

Milena Lazova
Milena Lazova
English
Cecilia Gigliotti

I have extensive experience writing in a variety of genres, from literary novels to music reviews to academic articles. I appreciate the power of words.

Geoffrey Mutie

My name is Geoffrey! I am constantly looking for new ways to improve my writing skills and my interpersonal skills, which in my opinion help a person be professional.

Milena Lazova

I'm an ESL teacher with over 7 years of experience in providing original content. I really like writing educational articles which may help others learn some aspects of English.